SMD Component Sizes Decoded: Imperial vs Metric Code

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Navigating the Complexities of SMT Component Size

When determining the SMD component size, two measurement systems are commonly used: Imperial and Metric codes. This article will provide a detailed comparison of these two measurement systems and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

SMD component package sizes

  • 01005 (imperial: 0.004 x 0.002 inches, metric: 0.1 x 0.05 mm)
  • 0201 (imperial: 0.012 x 0.006 inches, metric: 0.3 x 0.15 mm)
  • 0402 (imperial: 0.016 x 0.008 inches, metric: 0.4 x 0.2 mm)
  • 0603 (imperial: 0.024 x 0.012 inches, metric: 0.6 x 0.3 mm)
  • 0805 (imperial: 0.032 x 0.016 inches, metric: 0.8 x 0.4 mm)
  • 1206 (imperial: 0.047 x 0.022 inches, metric: 1.2 x 0.6 mm)
  • 1210 (imperial: 0.047 x 0.04 inches, metric: 1.2 x 1 mm)
  • 1812 (imperial: 0.071 x 0.047 inches, metric: 1.8 x 1.2 mm)
  • 2220 (imperial: 0.087 x 0.087 inches, metric: 2.2 x 2.2 mm)
  • 3528 (imperial: 0.14 x 0.14 inches, metric: 3.5 x 2.8 mm)
  • 5050 (imperial: 0.197 x 0.197 inches, metric: 5 x 5 mm)

Imperial Code

The Imperial code system, also known as the JEDEC code, is the measurement system that is most commonly used in the United States and Japan. In this system, SMD component size is represented by a three-digit number, with the first two digits representing the width and the last digit representing the height. For example, a 0201 SMD component would be 0.02 inches wide and 0.01 inches tall.

One of the advantages of the Imperial code system is that it is relatively easy to understand. The measurements are in inches, which is a unit of measurement that is familiar to many people. Additionally, the three-digit code makes it easy to identify the size of an SMD component at a glance.

However, the Imperial code system also has some disadvantages. One of the main disadvantages is that it can be challenging to work with tiny components, as the smallest component size that can be represented using this system is 0201 (0.02 inches by 0.01 inches). This means it is not well suited for applications with tiny components.

Smd Component Size Is Becoming Smaller
SMD component size is becoming smaller

Metric Code

The Metric code system, also known as the IEC code, is the measurement system that is most commonly used in Europe and other parts of the world. In this system, SMD component size is represented by a four-digit number, with the first two digits representing the width and the last two digits representing the height. For example, a 0402 SMD component would be 0.04 mm wide and 0.02 mm tall.

One of the advantages of the Metric code system is that it is well-suited for applications with tiny components. The smallest component size that can be represented using this system is 0201 (0.02 mm by 0.01 mm), much smaller than the smallest size that can be represented using the Imperial code system.

Another advantage of the Metric code system is that it is based on the metric system of measurement, which is used in many parts of the world. This makes it more consistent with other measurements and can make it easier to use for people who are more familiar with the metric system.

However, the Metric code system also has some disadvantages. One of the main disadvantages is that it can be more challenging to understand for people unfamiliar with the metric system of measurement. Additionally, the four-digit code can make it more challenging to identify the size of an SMD component at a glance.

Shrinking SMD Components: The Future of the SMT Industry

As the electronics industry continues to evolve, so does the SMD component size used in surface-mount technology (SMT). In recent years, there has been a trend towards using smaller and smaller components. This trend is driven by the need for smaller, more compact electronic devices and the desire to pack more functionality into a single device.

One of the most notable examples of this trend is the emergence of ultra-small package (USP) sizes, such as the 01005 package. Measuring just 0.4mm x 0.2mm, these tiny components are pushing the limits of what is possible in component miniaturization. USPs are becoming increasingly common in many electronic devices, including smartphones, laptops, and wearable devices.

However, the push towards smaller SMD component sizes is challenging. As components shrink, the manufacturing process becomes increasingly complex, with tighter tolerances and more incredible difficulty in handling and placing the components on the PCB. Additionally, smaller components may be more prone to damage and have a higher risk of failure.

Despite these challenges, the trend towards smaller component sizes is likely to continue, driven by the need for ever-smaller, more powerful electronic devices. As the electronics industry continues to evolve, we can expect to see even more miniaturization in the years to come.

To meet the demand for smaller components, manufacturers are investing in new and advanced technologies such as advanced packaging, flip chip, wafer-level packaging and more. These technologies are helping to make it possible to create smaller, more densely packed components that can be used in a wide range of electronic devices.

In conclusion, the trend towards smaller component sizes in the SMT industry is driven by the need for more compact, powerful electronic devices. While ultra-small package sizes are becoming increasingly common, manufacturers are also looking to new technologies to help meet the demand for smaller components. We expect to see even more miniaturization in electronics as we look to the future.

Q&A

What are the two measurement systems commonly used when determining SMD component size?

Imperial and Metric codes are the two measurement systems commonly used when determining SMD component size.

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